Google gobbles up Motorola Mobility for Mobile Patents

This morning Google anounced that they just bought Motorola Mobility for $12.5 billion. With all the latest Mobile patents war between Apple, Microsoft and Google, they were obviously chasing the strong portfolio of more than 17000 patents.

Microsoft was interested in acquiring Motorola’s patent portfolio that would have allowed it to torpedo Android even further. The possibility of that deal brought Google to the negotiation table, resulting in the blockbuster sale. OM Malik on GigaOM

Pissed that they lost the last fight over Nortel’s patents, Google had to do something. They were probably looking to secure their Android platform from rival, which means more control over the “open” platform (don’t be fool). They will be able to deploy Android update much faster or at least to put pressure on these OEMs (HTC, Samsung) not fast enough. They can defend Android much better with that acquisition, as MG Siegler on Techcrunch wrote:

What happens when the iPhone 5 launches and everyone wants it? That includes many people currently using Android phones. After a few months of this, Google grows frustrated that none of their OEMs can release a device that matches the build-quality that Apple puts out there. But wait, they now have their own company they can at the very least use to apply to pressure the other OEMs to force them to do better work!

More on that over RWW and Techcrunch

Silverlight, the Microsoft RIA, Keynote at the W3Québec meetup

This monday, my friend at the W3Qc association, Benoit Piette invited Laurent Duveau from the GUVSM to give a keynote about the Microsoft Rich Internet Application product; Silverlight.

Here’s my little recap of the entire keynote

Silverlight is a RIA brought by Microsoft. It’s a plugin, like Flash that users can install in their browser. However it’s still a beta, version 2 will be release in 2008 and a mobile version is under development. The current beta, version 2 beta came out in April 2008.

How Silverlight work

Silverlight use the .Net framework ACL directly inside the browser client. This way .Net programmers can use the languages they are already use to, #C, VB, Ruby, etc. The user on his side just receive Html/JavaScript the same way JSP technology works.

Silverlight use the XAML a declarative XML based language by Microsoft. Continue reading